Sunday, February 5, 2012

Fifth Sunday after the Epiphany: Those pugnacious "super apostles"

Opening Sentence
Nations shall come to your light, and kings to the brightness of your rising. Isaiah 60:3

Collect of the Day
Set us free, O God, from the bondage of our sins, and give us the liberty of that abundant life which you have made known o us in your Son our Savior Jesus Christ; who lives and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Psalter: Psalm 93, 96

Lessons: Genesis 24:50-67, 2 Timothy 2:14-21, Mark 10:13-22

Among the most pugnacious and disagreeable of Paul's opponents were the so-called "super apostles," those who claimed a superior knowledge of the mysteries of God and derided Paul as a novice. Two of the worst offenders were Hymenaeus and Philetus, who were propagating the outlandish claim "that the resurrection has already happened." Paul disowned these men and their claims, noting that "They are upsetting the faith of some."

The claim by Hymenaeus and Philetus "that the resurrection has already happened" was "upsetting" to some because it was self-serving and self-glorifying. It set these "super apostles" above those, like Paul, who humbly and freely admitted that "the resurrection from the dead" was a goal which they had "not yet attained" (Philippians 3:12-16).

The resurrection is the outcome of a life lived in obedience to Christ. Paul was correct in his attitude of humility, knowing that the closer he got to the goal, the less he should think of himself. Union with Christ was, for Paul, a lifelong journey which required dying to self in order to be fully realized. This side of eternity, he knew that he could never confidently claim to have reached this ultimate outcome without calling attention to himself instead of Christ.

The resurrection, after all, is all about Christ. Inasmuch as we experience Christ working in our lives to transform us out of a life of sin and into a life of obedience, we can experience something of the benefits of the resurrection now. But the full implications of the resurrection will not be realized until the final consummation at the last day. In Christ, the last day is brought into the present from the future. But by claiming "that the resurrection has already happened," Hymenaeus and Philetus were projecting themselves from the present into the future, thus "upsetting the faith of some" by setting themselves above all accountability and discipline. They were free to "live and let live," indulge every carnal passion, and look down upon those pitiful souls who had not yet realized such "freedom."

Paul warns Timothy to avoid such persons and to go about his work faithfully, not quarreling about words but "rightly handling the word of truth." For the truth, spoken humbly yet unashamedly, will expose every lie for what it is.

(JAG)

The Power of Your Love